The Jewish-American Hall of Fame’s website www.amuseum.org made its first appearance on the internet in 1996. In 2002, it won the Numismatic Literary Guild’s (NLG) award as the Best Non-Commercial Website. In May 2021, the newly expanded website makes its debut, just in time to celebrate Jewish American Heritage Month.

Mel Wacks, Founding Director of the Jewish-American Hall of Fame, has worked for over a year to make this possible, along with programmer Sumera Manzoor.

Over 60 pages have been added, featuring large photos of the Jewish-American Hall of Fame medals and texts that are easy to read on smartphones as well as computer screens. The new pages picture medals created by renowned medalists like Eugene Daub, Alex Shagin, Marika Somogyi, Paul Vincze, and Gerta Ries Wiener.

Pages are easily navigatable by topic, such as Entertainment, Military, Music, Science, Sports, etc.

Honorees range from the famous (Albert Einstein, George Gershwin, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Houdini, et al) to relatively unknowns (Gertrude Elion, Ernestine Rose, and “Rosie” Rosenthal). In addition to biographies, an informative and entertaining video can be viewed for virtually every inductee.

The old website, containing a Virtual Tour Through 500 Years of Jewish American History, Quizzes, The Harry Flower Collection of Einstein Medals, etc., has been kept intact and accessible in the Archives section of the revamped website. In addition, several books can be read on the website: The Handbook of Biblical Numismatics and Medals of the Jewish-American Hall of Fame by Mel Wacks, and Antisemitic Bigotry on Historic Medals by Dr. Benjamin Weiss.

Mel Wacks says:

“You can spend hours walking virtually around the halls of the Jewish-American Hall of Fame at www.amuseum.org and enjoy viewing masterpieces of medallic art, and learning about outstanding individuals and historic events, who you may or may not have ever heard of.”

Wacks also invites everyone who would like to see the physical exhibit of Jewish-American Hall of Fame plaques to visit the Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond.
 

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