Künker Ancient and World Coin Spring Auctions Now Open

Künker Spring Auctions by Künker GmbH ……
 

A Feast by Collectors for Collectors

It is very rare to see so many special collections at once as in Künker’s auction week taking place from 16 to 20 March 2020. The highlight is obviously the Samel Collection of Jewish coins; however, this is just one of more than 10 important special collections.

Künker’s Spring Auction Sales from 16 to 20 March 2020 prove once more that collectors approach Künker if they want to return a collection that they cherished for years to the cycle of coin trade. It is very rare to see so many special collections at once as it is the case during this auction week.

An outstanding highlight is obviously the Samel Collection of Jewish coins. However, there are also two impressive collections of medieval coins bearing witness to the profound knowledge of their creators – one of them focuses on north and central Germany, the other one on the area of Lake Constance.

Regarding ancient coins, collectors will find the fourth part of the Dr. W. R. Collection, parts of the Phoibos Collection, of the collection of a North German friend of ancient coins and of the collection of a Hanseatic connoisseur of Roman coins, not to forget the pieces from a private collector from the Lower Rhine. Catalogue 335 contains the Dr. Karl Walter Bach Collection of coins of new princes and the siege coins of the Eberhard Link Collection. In addition, there are comprehensive special collections focusing on Bavaria, Lübeck and Württemberg.

Auction 336 ends with a very interesting series of patterns of German coins.

Seize the opportunity to find the exact right piece for your own special collection. Künker’s Spring Auction Sales will provide you with enough material to do so.

Auction 333: Coins From the Ancient World

Monday, March 16, 2020

10.00 a.m. – 1.00 p.m. – No. 1 to No. 610

  • The Dr. W. R. Collection, part 4
  • Greek Coins

2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m. – No. 611 to No. 1202

  • Celtic Coins
  • Greek Coins
  • Roman Coins (until Severus Alexander)

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

10.00 a.m. – 1.00 p.m. – No. 1203 to No. 1720

  • Roman Coins (from Maximinus I Thrax)
  • Great Migration
  • Byzantium
  • Crusader
  • Orientals

Once more, the auction week starts with another part of the Dr W. R. Special Collection, this time, the numismatic journey leads us to Asia Minor and Cyprus. Whether it be Pharnaces I or Tissaphernes, Homer or Sappho, panthers, dolphins or bees – the entire imagery of the Greek coinage of Asia Minor prior to Roman times comes to life on these coins.

A few Celtic coins are followed by about 220 lots of Greek pieces, including an impressive series of Macedonian tetradrachms and staters, among others from Akanthos, Mende, Olynthus, Sermylia and the Orreskioi. Several Greek coins belong to collections of which parts were already sold in previous auctions, namely the Phoibos Collection and the collection of a north German friend of ancient coins.

Those who are interested in Roman portraiture but do not have the means to collect perfect aurei will be amazed by the collection of a Hanseatic connoisseur of Roman coins. With excellent knowledge and taste, he collected denarii, antoniniani and bronze coins featuring splendid portraits for decades. His collection is complemented by pieces of a private collector from the Lower Rhine area focusing on interesting coins of the Roman provinces. The estimates are very attractive; therefore, it is very likely that only very few pieces will be sold at the starting price.

Of course, there is a wide selection for collectors of Roman gold coins, too. An extremely rare
solidus of Procopius of excellent provenance is especially spectacular. The piece is from the Jameson and the ESR Collection.

Auction 333 ends with Byzantine and oriental pieces as well as Crusader coins.

No. 44: Dr W. R. Coll. Pharnaces I, King of Pontus around 185–156 BC. Drachm. Very rare. From the Egon Beckenbauer Collection. Very fine +. Estimate: 3,000 euros

No. 318: Dr W. R. Coll. Kos (Caria). Nikias, tyrant. AE, around 30 BC. Very rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 2,500 euros

No. 647: Pannonia. Tetradrachm, zigzag type, 3rd/2nd century. Extremely fine. Estimate: 2,500 euros

No. 713: Orreskioi (Macedonia). Stater, 500–480. Extremely fine. Estimate: 5,000 euros

No. 731: Alexander III of Macedon. Stater, posthumous 319–315, Sardis. Almost FDC. Estimate: 6,000 euros

No. 879: Roman Republic. 60 asses, after 211. Extremely fine / Very fine +. Estimate: 5,000 euros

No. 993: Hadrian. As, 125–128. From the collection of a Hanseatic connoisseur of Roman coins. Almost extremely fine / Extremely fine. Estimate: 100 euros

No. 1330: Commodus Caesar. Denarius, 175–176. From the collection of a Hanseatic connoisseur of Roman coins. Extremely fine / Almost extremely fine. Estimate: 125 euros

No. 1573: Procopius. Solidus, 365–366. From the Jameson and ESR Collections. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 50,000 euros

Auction 334: The Samel Collection: Jewish Coins and Medals

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

2.00 p.m. – 6.30 p.m. – No. 2001 to No. 2599

  • The Samel Collection of Jewish Coins and Medals

The Samel Collection of Jewish coins and medals featured in auction 334 is the highlight of the Künker auction week. The catalogue written by Johannes Nollé is a monument to one of the most important collections of Jewish coins and medals ever brought together. It covers the history of the Jewish people from the Persian conquest of Judea in the sixth century BCE to our times, with the collection’s focal point being on ancient times.

The collection does not only comprise Jewish but also Roman coins that celebrate victories over the Jewish people. Among them is a wealth of historically extremely significant pieces that may serve as material evidence to the literary reports written by Flavius Josephus.

Furthermore, the auction contains spectacular medals, which remind us, on the one hand, of the prejudices against Jews and, on the other hand, of the attempts of the 19th century to integrate the Jewish people as citizens with equal rights.

It ends with a series of gems, seals, weights and other objects that demonstrate that there had been Jewish life in the region of Palestine long before the first coins of Judea were minted.

No. 2070: Hasmonean dynasty. Mattathias Antigonos, 40–37. Prutah, Jerusalem. Extremely rare. Very fine. Estimate: 25,000 euros

No. 2271: Jewish War. Shekel, year 4 (= 69/70), Jerusalem. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 12,500 euros

No. 2312: Vespasian. Aureus, 72–73. Commemorating the triumphal procession to celebrate the victory over the Jews. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 20,000 euros

No. 2334: Domitian Caesar. Aureus, October 70, Caesarea Maritima. Minted by Titus on the occasion of the gladiator games organised for Domitian’s birthday. The only known specimen. About extremely fine. Estimate: 30,000 euros

No. 2375: Bar Kokhba revolt. Sela, year 1 (= 132/3). Very rare. About extremely fine. Estimate: 25,000 euros

No. 2523: HRE. Leopold I, 1657–1705. Silver medal 1686, unsigned. Commemorating the Siege of Buda in 1686. Extremely rare. About extremely fine. Estimate: 2,000 euros

No. 2596: Silver amulet against the devil, the evil eye, the fever and diseases. Estimate: 1,250 euros

Auction 335: Coins and Medals From Medieval and Modern Times

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

10.00 a.m. – 1.00 p.m. – No. 3001 to No. 3513

  • Medieval Time
  • Bracteats
  • Germany: Aachen – Bavaria (until Karl Albert)

2.00 p.m. – 6.00 p.m. – No. 3514 to No. 4248

  • Germany: Bavaria (from Maximilian III Joseph) – Rostock

Thursday, March 19, 2020

10.00 a.m. – 1.00 p.m. – No. 4249 to No. 4796

  • Germany: Saxony – Wurzburg
  • Medals
  • Habsburg (until Holy Roman Empire)

2.00 p.m. – 6.00 p.m. – No. 4797 to No. 5535

  • Habsburg (from Austrian Empire)
  • Europe
  • Oversea

On 18 and 19 March 2020, Künker will hold the third auction of its Spring Auction Sales. It starts at least as spectacular as the second auction ended. However, now a different period is at the centre of attention. Those who are interested in medieval Germany will find a wealth of extremely rare material of outstanding quality and great art historical importance.

The first of the two collections comprises 250 lots and belonged to a passionate numismatist. The collection reflects the great expertise of the man who built it: it contains great rarities, but also many most beautiful pieces of a certain coin type. As an example, we want to mention the probably most beautiful known specimen of the splendid rider bracteate of Louis III of Thuringia. And the unique imperial bracteate from Eschwege – a historic testimony to the emperor’s visit of the “Boyneburg” in 1188, during which he settled a dispute between the Vogt and the abbess about the privilege of minting coins.

Additionally, 50 lots of medieval bracteates from Upper Swabia and from the region of Lake Constance will be on sale. Among these, too, there are numerous extremely rare pieces of outstanding quality.

Thus, every collector of medieval rarities should save the morning of 18 March 2020 in his agenda!

No. 3011: Charlemagne. Denarius 771–793, Mainz. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 8,000 euros

No. 3114: Meißen. Conrad the Great of Wettin, 1127–1156. Bracteate. Meißen. Very rare. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 7,500 euros

No. 3128: Upper Lusatia. Vladislaus II of Bohemia, 1158–1173. Bracteate, Bautzen or Görlitz. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 7,500 euros

No. 3165: Thuringia. Ludwig III, 1172–1190. Bracteate, Gotha. FDC. Estimate: 10,000 euros No. 3172: Eschwege. Abbess Gertrude, 1180–1188. Bracteate, Eschwege. Unique. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 10,000 euros

No. 3173: Fritzlar. Conrad of Wittelsbach, 1183–1200. Bracteate, Fritzlar. Probably the only specimen on the market. Almost FDC. Estimate: 7,500 euros

No. 3214: Ulm. Frederick II, 1215–1250. Bracteate, about 1220–1250. Rare. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 3,000 euros

No. 3337: Ulm. Conrad IV, 1250–1254. Bracteate, about 1250–1270. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 2,000 euros

No. 3348: Sigmaringen. Godfrey III, 1247–1263. Bracteate, 1250–1260. Very rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 1,000 euros

Coins and Medals From the German States: The Special Collections Bavaria, Lübeck and
Württemberg

The section of coins and medals from the German States comprises as much as three special collections: Bavaria, Lübeck and Württemberg.

The Collection of Bavarian coins and medals contains about 330 lots and covers the time frame from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. The focal point is on early modern times and the period is represented by numerous talers. However, there are many pieces from the 19th century, too, including an extensive series of the popular commemorative coins of Ludwig I, most of them of outstanding quality.

The special collection Lübeck comprises ca. 110 lots with coins and medals of the city and the bishops as well as a series of medals of the mayor. It covers the time frame from the 16th to the 18th century. The coinage of Lübeck is famous for all the beautiful city views; but there are also these splendid schautalers depicting biblical scenes like the Marriage at Cana and the Baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River.

The third special collection on sale in the section of coins from the German States is dedicated to Württemberg. The time frame covers the period from the first Württemberg talers struck in 1507 to the coins of the Kingdom of Württemberg of the 19th century. Special collectors can look forward to very rare talers and splendid medals among the 150 lots.

Of course, a wealth of interesting individual pieces from the German States will be on sale in addition to these three special collections. You see, browsing through the material is worth it for everyone.

No. 3375: Bavaria. Duke William IV, 1508–1550. Silver medal 1535, cast, unsigned, by Matthes Gebel. Probably original cast. From the Gutekunst Collection. Very rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 1,000 euros

No. 3457: Bavaria. Elector Ferdinand Maria, 1651–1679. Reichstaler 1657, Munich, on the vicariate. Very rare. Almost extremely fine / Extremely fine. Estimate: 4,000 euros

No. 3498: Bavaria. Emperor Charles Albert, 1726–1745. Taler 1738, Munich. Very rare. Extremely fine +. Estimate: 10,000 euros

No. 3714: Brandenburg-Prussia. John of Küstrin, 1535–1571. Taler 1545, Krossen. Very rare. Very fine. Estimate: 20,000 euros

No. 4002: Lübeck / Diocese. Christian August, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, 1706–1726. Taler 1724, Eutin. Very rare. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 7,500 euros

No. 4008: Lübeck / City. Taler 1544. From the Dr Dieter Dummler Collection. Very rare. Very fine. Estimate: 20,000 euros

No. 4044: Lübeck / City. Broad, double schautaler n.d. (1619–1644) by H. von der Klähren. Very rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 1,000 euros

No. 4147: Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Adolf Friedrich, 1610–1658. Triple reichstaler 1613, Gadebusch. Triple glückstaler (“lucky taler”). Very rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 40,000 euros

No. 4204: Pomerania. Philip II, 1606–1618. 1 1/2 reichstaler 1613, Szczecin. Extremely rare. Very fine to extremely fine. Estimate: 20,000 euros

No. 4246: Rostock. Broad 1 1/2 reichstaler 1605 commemorating the hereditary homage to Charles, Duke of Mecklenburg on 27 August. Very rare. Very fine +. Estimate: 20,000 euros

No. 4443: Württemberg. John Frederick, 1608–1628. Reichstaler 1624, Christophstal. Very rare. Extremely fine +. Estimate: 6,000 euros

No. 4476: Württemberg. Charles Eugene, 1744–1793. Reichstaler 1744, Stuttgart. Very rare. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 6,000 euros

No. 4496: Württemberg. Frederick II (I), 1797–1806–1816. Conventionsthaler 1798, London. First strike. Almost FDC. Estimate: 5,000 euros

Coins of the Holy Roman Empire and the Bach Collection: Coins of New Princes

The section German States is followed by coins of the Holy Roman Empire including numerous rarities. The highlight of this section is the Dr. Karl Walter Bach Collection with coins of the new princes from Austria. The coins of these families – which had originally been of rather low nobility, middle-class or from another country and which had been raised to the princely state by the emperor as a reward for the services one of their representatives had rendered to the dynasty – are in most cases extremely rare because they were not intended to enter circulation but to show status. They bear numismatic testimony to the fact that the society of early modern times was willing to let innovative minds climb the social ladder as long as they knew how the political power game worked.

No. 4610: HRE. Charles V, 1519–1558. Silver cast medal 1532, unsigned, by F. Hagenauer. Very rare. From the Lanna Collection. Early, contemporary cast. About extremely fine. Estimate: 5,000 euros

No. 4751: HRE. Charles VI, 1711–1740. Double reichstaler 1713, Sankt Veit. Very rare. About extremely fine. Estimate: 25,000 euros

No. 4857: Dietrichstein. Sigismund Helfried, 1664–1698. Reichstaler 1664, Graz. Very rare. First strike. FDC. Estimate: 5,000 euros

No. 4860: Eggenberg. Johann Ulrich, 1623–1634. Double reichstaler 1629, probably Prague. Very rare. Very fine to extremely fine. Estimate: 10,000 euros

No. 4877: Orsini-Rosenberg. Franz Xaver, 1739–1796, prince since 1790. Conventionsthaler 1793, Vienna. Very rare. First strike. Almost FDC. Estimate: 5,000 euros

Siege Coins – Another Part of the Link Collection

In auction 335, another part of the Link Collection will be on sale. This time, siege coins are on offer – a kind of emergency money issued to guarantee the circulation of official money within a besieged town. The about 300 lots are split up within the catalogue according to the cities in which they circulated. Whether it be the Siege of Breisach or Landau, Rákóczi’s War of Independence, or all the issues minted during the Eighty Years’ War between Spain and the Netherlands: the Link Collection provides a good overview of this historically interesting topic of collecting.

No. 3833: Breisach. One-sided taler klippe 1633, minted during the siege by Rhinegrave Otto and Margrave Frederick of Baden. From the Eberhard Link Collection. Very rare. Very fine. Estimate: 3,000 euros

No. 3974: Landau. One-sided klippe of 4 livres and 4 sous 1702, minted during the siege by imperial troops commanded by Louis of Baden in the context of the War of the Spanish Succession, commissioned by the French general V. Mélac. From the Eberhard Link Collection. Very rare. About extremely fine. Estimate: 2,500 euros

No. 4253: Saxony. Maurice, 1547–1553. One-sided taler klippe 1547, Leipzig, minted during the siege of Leipzig by John Frederick of Saxony. From the Eberhard Link Collection. Extremely rare. Very fine. Estimate: 3,000 euros

No. 5206: Netherlands. Kampen. One-sided taler klippe of 42 stuivers 1578 (issue of July), minted during the siege by troops of the States General of the Netherlands. From the Eberhard Link Collection. Rare. Very fine to extremely fine. Estimate: 1,250 euros

World Coins

Of course, this auction, too, offers a comprehensive series of world coins. Among them are not only several interesting individual pieces but also a large series of Russian coins.

No. 5257: Norway. Christian IV. Speciesdaler 1629, Christiania. Very rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 15,000 euros

No. 5263: Poland. Stephen Báthory, 1576–1586. Reichstaler 1585 NB, Baia Mare. Very rare. Extremely fine +. Estimate: 12,500 euros

No. 5320: Russia. Ivan III, 1740–1741. Rouble 1741, Saint Petersburg. Very rare. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 10,000 euros

No. 5521: USA. 50 cents (1/2 dollar) 1794, Philadelphia. PCGS VF20. Very rare. About very fine. Estimate: 10,000 euros

Auction 336: World Gold Coins – German Coins After 1871

Friday, March 20, 2020

10.00 a.m. – 1.00 p.m – No. 6001 to No. 6658

  • Europe
  • Oversea
  • Habsburg
  • Germany
  • Medals

2.00 p.m. – 6.30 p.m. – No. 6659 to No. 7820

  • German Coins after 1871

As if that wouldn’t be enough, on Friday, 20 March 2020, an auction of world gold coins and German coins after 1871 will be held. At this point, we will only mention the highlights of this auction:

In the section of foreign pieces you will find a gold medal of 15 ducats by P. H. Müller commemorating the defense of Corfu against the Turkish fleet in 1716 and a 37 1/2 rouble piece of Russian tsar Nicholas II of 1902, of which only 225 specimens were minted.

A quintuple ducat minted in 1629 for Ferdinand II in Wrocław is an example for the section of coins from the Holy Roman Empire.

The three most expensive pieces in the section German States are: a gold medal of the city of Emden of 4 ducats minted on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the “college of forty” in 1689, a double gold gulden of Hesse-Kassel minted in 1677 of Eder River gold and a tenfold ducat from Regensburg of 1766 commemorating the homage to Emperor Joseph II.

The auction week ends with almost 1,200 lots of German coins minted after 1871. In addition to a wide-ranged choice of coins of the German Empire, the collection of patterns is especially worth mentioning. It contains some extremely rare trial pieces of silver coins of the German Empire, including a unique trial piece of Frederick the Wise and a unique trial piece of Saxe-Meiningen of 2 marks minted in 1900 D.

No. 6087: Corfu / Greece. Gold medal of 15 ducats by P. H. Müller commemorating the defence of Corfu in 1716. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 35,000 euros

No. 6230: Russia. Nicholas II. 37 1/2 roubels (=100 francs) 1902, Saint Petersburg. PCGS MS62+. Only 225 specimens minted. Extremely fine to FDC. Estimate: 150,000 euros

No. 6408: HRE. Ferdinand II. 5 ducats 1629, Wrocław. Extremely fine. Estimate: 10,000 euros

No. 6521: Emden. Gold medal of 4 ducats 1689, unsigned, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the “college of forty”. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 30,000 euros

No. 6536: Hesse-Kassel. Charles, 1670–1730. 2 Gold gulden 1677, Kassel, Eder gold. From the Julius Collection. Unique. Very fine. Estimate: 75,000 euros

No. 6601: Regensburg. 10 ducats 1766, Nuremberg. Commemorating the homage to Joseph II. Extremely rare. Extremely fine. Estimate: 50,000 euros

No. 7513: German Empire. Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. Ernest II, 1844–1893. 20 marks 1872. About extremely fine. Estimate: 60,000 euros

No. 7593: German New Guinea. 10 New Guinean marks 1895 A. Only 2,000 specimens minted. Extremely fine. Estimate: 25,000 euros

No. 7778: Trial piece for Saxony, George II., 5 marks 1902 E. Probably the only known specimen. Extremely fine to FDC struck in proof quality. Estimate: 40,000 euros

No. 7781: Trial piece for Saxony, Frederick Augustus III., 3 marks 1917 E. “Frederick the Wise”. Probably unique. Extremely fine. Estimate: 17,500 euros

The catalogues can be ordered at Künker, Nobbenburger Straße 4a, 49076 Osnabrück; phone:
+49 541 / 96 20 20; fax: +49 541 / 96 20 222; or via e-mail: service@kuenker.de. You can
also access the auction catalogues online at www.kuenker.de.

Results of eLive Auction 332

Two exciting evenings with our eLive Premium Auction 332 are behind us. The 1,000 lot numbers achieved more than 2.5 times of the total estimate of 135,000 euros.

We would particularly like to emphasize the collection of Friedrich Popken with strucks from Lower Saxony as well as the taler find from Betzenstein, which caused great interest among our bidders.

We would like to thank everyone who took part in our online auction, and we would be delighted to see you from March 16th-20th, 2020 in Osnabrück during our Spring Auction Sales 333-336.

Result List and Unsold Lots

Were your bids successful? Are you the winner of one or more lot numbers? You can acquire all lots which were not sold during the auction at the estimate from our auction.

You can buy the unsold lots in the Künker Onlineshop.

Here you can find the auction catalogs as well as the result list from the past Künker auctions.

As a bidder, in the next few days you will automatically receive the results list and, of course, your newly-acquired collector items by mail. If you have not taken part in our auctions but are interested in our results list, we will gladly send it to you upon request.
 

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