Venezuela 1989 bimetallic
The only Venezuela 1989 bimetallic 20 Bolivares pattern certified by NGC thus far has been graded MS 66.

By Numismatic Guaranty Corporation ……..
 

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, Venezuela was unable to produce sufficient circulation issue coinage at its mint in Caracas so the country needed to rely on foreign mints for further production. Mints such as the Royal Canadian Mint, Werdohl Metalworks, and Schwerte Metalworks all produced circulation coinage for Venezuela.

Changes in the design of Venezuelan coins were also taking place at this time. This process naturally included the production of patterns, or proposed coins not currently in circulation. The Schwerte Metalworks (VDN United German Nickel-Werke in Düsseldorf, Germany) proposed new circulating denominations of 10 and 20 Bolivares. Dated 1989, the design closely matched the circulating Venezuelan coinage of the day – the arms, dated, denomination and country were featured on the obverse and a bust of Simon Bolivar designed by Barre with the inscription “Bolivar Liberatdor” (Simon Bolivar Liberator) graced the reverse.

Venezuela_1989_bimetallic_pattern_reverseThe 10 Bolivares would be a copper-nickel coin while the 20 Bolivares would be bi-metallic with a center of 65% copper, 30% nickel, and 5% tin surrounded by a ring composed of 95% nickel and 5% copper. These pieces featured the text “DEUTSCHE NICKEL A.C. SCHWESTE” and “MUNSTER” (meaning “Essai” or “Pattern”) on the reverse to signify that they were pattern issues. Both the designs and denominations were rejected by the Venezuelan government, and the coins were never produced for general circulation.

The mintage of these two patterns is currently unknown. There is only one known example of the 10 Bolivares issue in private hands, while there are only five known specimens of the 20 Bolivares, one of which has rim damage and wear (it is believed to have been used in testing for vending). The only Venezuela 1989 bi-metallic 20 Bolivares pattern certified by NGC thus far has graded MS 66.

Venezuelan coinage has always been a diverse and highly collectible area of numismatics. This continues to hold true with diverse modern issues made at several mints, creating significant varieties. This pattern, while made only 27 years ago, shows the complexity and appeal of this field of numismatics.
 

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