Mike Byers Mint Error News - NGC Certifies 1943 Lincoln Cent Struck on Curaçao 25 Centstukken Planchet

3.6 Grams (64% Silver/36% Copper)

Ex: Fred Weinberg

 

By Mike Byers for Mint Error News ……
 

This is a world-class 1943 Lincoln cent major mint error. It’s many times rarer than the 1943 copper cent.

The United States Mint has produced coins for foreign governments at various times during its history. During World War II, the Mint in Philadelphia struck 1943 dated coins for the Netherlands, intended for circulation in their territories of Surinam and Curacao. These blank planchets weighed 3.575 grams, had a diameter of 19 mm, and the composition was 64% silver and 36% copper.

The Surinam/Curacao 1943 25 cent was struck at the Philadelphia Mint with a mintage of 2,000,000 for Surinam and a mintage of 500,000 for Curaçao.

In 1940, Nazi Germany conquered the Netherlands. The Dutch territories of Surinam (in northern South America) and Curaçao (an island in the Caribbean Sea north of Surinam and part of the Netherlands Antilles) were protected by the Allied forces. Subsequently, the U.S. Mints struck coins for these countries during the war.

According to public auction records since World War II (75 years), PCGS and NGC have just authenticated and certified a total of five 1943 Lincoln cents struck from blank planchets from Surinam/Curaçao.

Recent auction sales of 1943 Lincoln cents struck on Surinam/Curaçao planchets:

  • Heritage Auctions – NGC XF 40: $14,950
  • Bowers & Merena – ANACS VF Details Net F 12 Damaged: $16,675
  • Heritage Auctions – NGC MS 61 (Damaged): $24,000

There is one known designated as “struck on a Netherlands 25 Cent planchet” that sold in a Heritage Auction for $24k certified by NGC as MS 61. Although this coin is damaged with a clearly visible X cut, it was not net graded by NGC. It was pedigreed to the Albert Michael Pratt collection.

According to the Heritage Auction write-up:

The strike details are crisp overall, and there are only a couple of small patches of the underlying silver that show through the copper on each side. Apparently, someone else was unsure of the composition and cut a long X into the right obverse field out from Lincoln’s chin, but the underlying silver does not show in that area. Undoubtedly, this is one of the most intriguing errors we have seen in many years.

There are two known designated as “struck on Curaçao 25 Cent planchets” that have sold in public auctions. The most recent was the NGC-certified XF 40 that was sold by Heritage Auctions for $14,950 in 2015.

There is one known designated as “struck on a Surinam 25 Cent planchet” that was certified by ANACS as Fine 12 Damaged Net Graded and sold for $16,675 in a Bowers & Merena 2006 public auction.

This one offered is certified MS 61 NGC and designated as “struck on a Curaçao 25 Centstukken planchet” and was in the Fred Weinberg Collection for over 20 years.

This 1943 Lincoln Cent struck on a Curaçao planchet looks copper and does not look at all like the Surinam/Curaçao 25 Cent piece photographed above. Considering that the damaged example sold in Heritage for $24,000, this undamaged example in the same MS 61 grade is very reasonably priced and offers considerable value.

This extremely rare 1943 Lincoln Cent off-metal would be the highlight and centerpiece of a collection of Lincoln cents, mint errors or coins struck during World War II.

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Mike Byers Mint Error News
 

1 COMMENT

  1. How can I get In touch with you I have a1943 Lincoln penny wheatpenny if I had way to send you a picture of the penny I would like to find out about this penny I have 3 Other wheatpenny they are 3. 1944 steel & 3.1945 & 3 1943 also get back soon as you can ok I live in Oklahoma city ok my name is Jody

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