AUSTRALIAN GOLD PROSPECTOR UNEARTHS 87-OUNCE SOLID GOLD NUGGET IN VICTORIA WITH MINELAB DETECTOR

Minelab, the world leader in providing metal detecting technologies for consumer, humanitarian demining and military needs, today announced that Australian gold prospector Michael Brown [pictured below] has uncovered an astonishing 87-ounce solid gold nugget during a prospecting expedition in Inglewood, a town located in the state of Victoria, Australia. Discovered in six inches of ground with a state-of-the-art Minelab detector, Brown’s find is estimated to be worth over $130,000 AUD based on Australia’s current gold price per ounce.

87 Oz Gold Nugget
87-OUNCE SOLID GOLD NUGGET

“I’m still in absolute shock about finding a gold nugget of this magnitude! As a professional gold prospector, this find is a monumental accomplishment in my career,” said Brown. “I’ve been using Minelab detectors for years and the investment has more than paid off.”

“We build our products with the goal of changing people’s fortunes,” said Gary Schafer, General Manager of Worldwide Consumer Markets. “We are so pleased that our detector was an essential part of Michael’s incredible find.”

Brown’s remarkable find falls on the heels of Minelab’s newest product release, the GPZ 7000. Equipped with Minelab’s exclusive groundbreaking Zero Voltage Transmission (ZVT) technology and state-of-the-art features, the GPZ 7000 offers the deepest ground penetration and represents the most significant advancement in gold detecting technologies in years.

Michael_BrownWith its “Super-D” coil configuration, the detector has proven to provide up to 40 percent depth improvement to other detector models on the market. The GPZ 14 coil is also fully submersible up to one meter in water and is powered with a high capacity lithium battery that can last over eight hours on just a single charge. The detector also contains embedded, state of the art anti-counterfeit technology.

To learn more about Minelab visit minelab.com.

About Minelab:

Minelab is an Australian-built, multi-award winning business that has successfully scaled world markets to command global leadership in its key areas of operation. Based in Torrensville, South Australia with regional headquarters in Cork, Ireland and Chicago, U.S. the company specializes in advanced electronic technologies. Since its origins in 1985 Minelab has been the world leader in providing metal detecting  technologies for consumer, humanitarian demining and military needs. Through devotion to research and development and innovative design, Minelab is today a major world manufacturer of hand-held metal detector products. Over the past 30 years, Minelab has introduced more innovative and practical technology than any of its competitors and has taken the metal detecting industry to new levels of excellence. Minelab is a Codan Limited company (ASX: “CDA”).

10 COMMENTS

  1. It wasn’t found with a minelab GPZ7000 it was a GPX4500 and a nugget finder 17×11 coil. I got some of the orgional photo’s that happens to have a GPX power cable in the photo..

  2. Maybe I should announce my 127 ouncer found near tarnagulla park!! and watch how minelab twist the story to their sale advantage.

    • This is the typical marketing spin, propaganda and bullshyzer required to sell a few hundred dollars worth of plastic and silicon for $10700. John is absolutely correct about the real facts of the find. The finder of the nugget contacted this site and asked them to correct it. Twelve months later it’s still here deceiving people. The link to this site has been sent to the ACCC.

        • “CoinWeek”, I have the screen shots from Mr Brown on Facebook, what do you have?
          Check the facts then print a retraction/apology.
          Naming and shaming the author of this deceitful article would also be appreciated by consumers.

          • Even if your are “Right” you are wrong…….
            What does Facebook have to do with an article on CoinWeek ??????
            The article posted was submitted as a Press Release by Minelab and reported by news organizations as seen in the video on the page. If Mr. Brown feels that any of the information in that report is inaccurate, wrong, misleading or otherwise in error, please ask him to post a comment here on CoinWeek or send us an email directly. We will be happy to address any concerns we have with him directly. I am sure that he does not need you to be an intermediary.

  3. The “Fair Dinkum” nugget was found by Mr Brown a WEEK BEFORE the release of the GPZ 7000 with a GPX 4500. It was NOT “found on the heels of Minelab’s newest product release, the GPZ 7000.”

  4. If the gold was found with a Minelab GPX4500, then the not-so-hidden advertisement for GPZ 7000 in the same article is not quite right. It gives the readers the impression that the gold was found with a GPZ 7000.

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