Buyer of Ultra-Rare 1894-S Barber Dime Crosses It to PCGS

The 1894-S dime, recently sold for $1,440,000, is now in a Professional Coin Grading Service holder, graded PCGS PR65+

 

The anonymous winning bidder for one of the most famous United States coins, the ultra-rare 1894-S Barber Dime that recently sold at auction for $1,440,000, has submitted the coin to Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) for Crossover Service. Previously housed in another grading company’s holder, the historic dime that once belonged to legendary collector Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. is now encapsulated in a state-of-the-art, high-security PCGS holder and graded PCGS PR65+.

The dime was sold on December 17, 2020, by Stack’s Bowers Galleries and promptly submitted by the new owner to PCGS for Crossover Service. It is one of just nine known specimens from a total mintage of 24 dimes made at the San Francisco Mint in 1894.

“We’re proud to have graded the Eliasberg specimen of the 1894-S Barber Dime,” remarks PCGS President Brett Charville. “This is one of the most iconic United States rare coins and is one of but a handful that regularly trade for more than $1 million when crossing the auction block. That PCGS was chosen to grade this seven-figure treasure shows the trust collectors place in the accuracy of our grading and security our holders provide their coins.”

The 1894-S Barber Dime is one of the most enigmatic of all United States numismatic rarities. It was struck at the United States Mint branch facility in San Francisco during a time when virtually all proof coins were produced at the Philadelphia Mint.

The reason the 1894-S Barber Dime was produced remains unclear, though one of the most common theories suggest that 24 of these Barber Dimes were struck in 1894 at the San Francisco Mint to help balance the mint’s accounting ledgers, which may have been $2.40 short.

Some numismatic experts believe San Francisco Mint Superintendent John Daggett gave many of the 24 dimes to his friends and associates and three to his young daughter Hallie. Decades later, when Hallie sold one of the dimes, she reportedly said she had spent one of the three as a child to buy ice cream. That story is intriguing but may be a tall tale involving a fabled and desirable rare coin.
 

5 COMMENTS

  1. Your article fails to mention the PCGS Upgraded this coin to a 65+
    I’m sure PCGS did that so they can promote themselves, seems self serving.

  2. I just don’t know why PCGS would be writing articles for coin week. This is just a fluff piece, it might as well say “advertisement” across the top of the page.

  3. Yeah I’m going to call out the owner and PCGS on this too. At the least, this is really bad optics… oh look, I bought a super rare coin, let’s see if I can get an inside track to get it up-graded. The owner makes $$$ because he can now sell it for much more, and PCGS gets the free advertising and bragging rights.

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