On Tuesday, December 22, United States Mint Director David J. Ryder participated in a virtual design unveiling for the 2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Coin Program. The designs will be featured on a gold coin, a silver coin, and a half dollar as authorized by Public Law 116-94 (Division K). All obverse and reverse designs were created by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program Designers and sculpted by United States Mint Medallic Artists.

US Mint Announces Designs for National Law Enforcement Memorial Commemorative Coin Program

Gold Coin Obverse

  • Designer: Frank Morris
  • Medallic Artist: Phebe Hemphill

The design depicts male and female officers in profile saluting, with the inscriptions “LIBERTY,” “2021,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Gold Coin Reverse

  • Designer: Ron Sanders
  • Medallic Artist: Craig Campbell

The design depicts a folded flag with three roses beneath symbolizing remembrance. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “FIVE DOLLARS,” and “E PLURIBUS UNUM.”

Silver Coin Obverse

  • Designer: Frank Morris
  • Medallic Artist: Phebe Hemphill

The design depicts a police officer kneeling next to a child, who is reading a book and sitting on a basketball, symbolizing service to the community and future generations. Inscriptions are “SERVE & PROTECT,” “LIBERTY,” “2021,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Silver Coin Reverse

  • Designer: Ron Sanders
  • Medallic Artist: John P. McGraw

The design depicts a handshake between a law enforcement officer and a member of the public, representing the work law enforcement officers do within their communities to increase safety through trusting relationships. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” and “ONE DOLLAR.”

Half Dollar Coin Obverse

  • Designer: Ron Sanders
  • Medallic Artist: John P. McGraw

The design depicts a sheriff’s star, representing the community served by law enforcement officers and the important role they play. Inscriptions are “SERVE AND PROTECT,” “LIBERTY,” “2021,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Half Dollar Coin Reverse

  • Designer: Heidi Wastweet
  • Medallic Artist: Renata Gordon

The design depicts an eye in a magnifying glass looking at a fingerprint, portraying the human side of justice, a reminder that law enforcement is not only officers on the street but also many others behind the scenes. It also features the emblem of the National Law Enforcement Museum. Inscriptions are “UNITED STATES of AMERICA,” “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” “HALF DOLLAR,” and “NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM.”

Mint Director Ryder, whose responsibilities include oversight of the United States Mint Police, one of the oldest federal law enforcement agencies, said:

“These designs will be featured on coins that honor the extraordinary service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers throughout the history of the United States. We hope this program will assist the Museum in its mission to bridge the past and the present and to increase public understanding and support for the law enforcement community.”

The on-sale date for products in the National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Commemorative Coin Program is to be determined and will be published on the Mint’s Product Schedule. When available, the Mint will accept orders at catalog.usmint.gov.

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About the United States Mint

usmintThe US Mint was created by Congress in 1792 and became part of the Department of the Treasury in 1873. It is the Nation’s sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage and is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the Nation to conduct its trade and commerce.

The United States Mint also produces numismatic products, including proof, uncirculated, and commemorative coins; Congressional Gold Medals; and silver and gold bullion coins. The Mint’s numismatic programs are self-sustaining and operate at no cost to taxpayers.
 

2 COMMENTS

  1. This Is A Great Story About The New Law Enforsment Coin ! I Will Be Looking For Them To Come Out To The Public . Cant Wait to Get My First One ! May God Bless !

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