President Trump Signs National Law Enforcement Museum Commemorative Coin Act

Proceeds from the sale of the commemorative coin will help endow programs and exhibits at the Museum without the use of taxpayer money

 

By National Law Enforcement Museum ……
 

The National Law Enforcement Museum at the Motorola Solutions Foundation Building is pleased to announce that President Donald J. Trump has signed the National Law Enforcement Museum Commemorative Coin Act into law. The bill, officially known as H.R. 1865, recently passed both the House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

“We are overjoyed that our nation’s lawmakers have recognized the importance of this Museum and the vital role of law enforcement in our society,” said National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund CEO Marcia Ferranto. “The significance of this coin and what it will mean both for the Museum and its supporters is immeasurable.”

Passage of the bill and the subsequent approval by President Trump allows the U.S. Department of Treasury to mint and issue up to 50,000 gold coins, 400,000 $1 silver coins, and 750,000 half-dollar clad coins that are emblematic of the National Law Enforcement Museum in the District of Columbia, as well as the service and sacrifice of law enforcement officers throughout the history of the United States. Minting of the coin is slated to begin in January 2021 and end in December 2021.

Proceeds from the sale of the commemorative coin will help endow programs and exhibits at the Museum without the use of taxpayer money.

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About the National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum

Authorized by Congress in 2000, the 57,000-square-foot National Law Enforcement Museum at the Motorola Solutions Foundation Building tells the story of American law enforcement by providing visitors a “walk in the shoes” experience along with educational journeys, immersive exhibitions, and insightful programs. The Museum is an initiative of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1984. For more information about the National Law Enforcement Museum, visit LawEnforcementMuseum.org.
 

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