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Two New Counterfeit Dollar “Varieties” – Jack Young’s Fun With Fakes

Jack Young - Counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar. Fun with Fakes.

By Jack D. Young, Early American Coppers (EAC), and the Dark Side Group ……
 

I had the opportunity to participate in The Coin Show’s Live “Mega Hangout” on Saturday, December 23, 2023, and in it I mentioned how the counterfeiters continue to mix and match obverse and reverse dies to make new counterfeits, and that I had seen a new dollar variety just that week.

 

The “coin” I mentioned was an 1874-S Trade Dollar; the obverse matches exactly the one used for known counterfeit 1874-CC Trades Dollars in fake “PCGS” holders.

And even in these documented “CC”s, there are two different reverses used!

The seller listed the “S” example twice, but it ended both times, so it’s still out there somewhere…

Counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar. Image: from an eBay listing.
Counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar. Image: from an eBay listing.
Close up of the 1874-S Trade Dollar listed on eBay.
Close up of the 1874-S Trade Dollar listed on eBay.

The next images are of the two known counterfeit 1874-CC Trade Dollars.

Two counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar obverses. Image: from an eBay listing.
Two counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar obverses. Image: from an eBay listing.

These two share a common obverse but use two different reverses, as seen in the mint mark:

Counterfeit 1874-CC Trade dollar reverses.
Counterfeit 1874-CC Trade dollar reverses.

The new “S Variety” uses a different reverse but the same obverse; many obvious common marks between them!

Matching die markers on two counterfeit 1874 Trade dollars.
Matching attribution markers on two counterfeit 1874 Trade dollars.

The new reverse has a number of interesting markers that may be used for other similar fakes:

Intersting attribution marks on the reverse of a counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar.
Intersting attribution marks on the reverse of a counterfeit 1874-S Trade Dollar.

Just a note, I have NOT found this counterfeit reverse in any current internet searches!

And the “twist”?

Taking a quick spin on the internet after the ball dropped, I found not only my first fake of 2024 but also another undocumented (by me, anyway) counterfeit dollar variety.

Counterfeit 1802 Draped Bust Dollar listed on eBay.
Counterfeit 1802 Draped Bust Dollar listed on eBay.

The seller had actually listed it and then revised the images and price; I saved the best images available from the two.

Counterfeit 1802 dollar listed on eBay.
Counterfeit 1802 dollar listed on eBay.

As a reference, I wrote a fourth CoinWeek “Family Counterfeit” article previously, one based on the 1799 B-10/BB-163 Large Eagle reverse dollar. Both obverses and reverses matched for all the different dated coins in that group, ranging from 1798 to 1804.

This latest example uses a different obverse, and it’s the first time that I’ve seen a counterfeit 1802/1, but it still appears to use the 1799 reverse.

Pictures are just good enough to see the fake date is a pretty good attempt on this one. But again, the reverse doesn’t match any of the genuine varieties known!

Counterfeit 1802 dollar date style compared to date styles of known varieties. Image: PCGS / Jack Young.
Counterfeit 1802 dollar date style compared to date styles of known varieties. Image: PCGS / Jack Young.

Images as included follow: an obverse comparison to the closest genuine 1802/1 variety BB-232, and an image comparison to the genuine 1799 BB-163 reverse.

Red circles highlight some of the differences; date is off as well
Red circles highlight some of the differences; date is off as well.
Green circules highlight common features that are different from the 1802/1 reverses.
Green circules highlight common features that are different from the 1802/1 reverses.

I can’t stress enough how important ATTRIBUTION is in these evaluations; I consider it the first line of defense against the growing number of counterfeit varieties.

The bad 1802/1 listing was ended with no sale; unfortunately, the seller had another example also listed. Images were worse for this one, but it’s still clear that it’s yet another bad apple.

eBay listing of a counterfeit 1802 Draped Bust dollar.
eBay listing of a counterfeit 1802 Draped Bust dollar.

This listing was ended as well, but it’s just a matter of time before we see them again!

Best as always,

Jack


 

MORE Articles on Counterfeit Coins by Jack D. Young

 

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Jack D. Young
Jack D. Young
An engineer by training, Jack D. Young is a researcher and author on the subject of the recent wave of deceptive struck counterfeits. He is the founder of the "Dark Side" Counterfeits and Fakes Facebook watch group, a participating member of Early American Coppers (EAC) since 2002, the Liberty Seated Collectors Club (LSCC), C4, the NLG, the ANA, and the ANS. Jack has consulted on the subject of counterfeits and their effect on the Hobby with staffers of the United States Senate Finance Committee, a senior member of the U.S. Secret Service (both with the ACTF as an Expert Network volunteer), and agents of both CBP and the Department of the Treasury. His work has appeared in various club journals, including The Numismatist, and he was acknowledged for his research by Q. David Bowers in the latter's The Copper Coins of Vermont (2018). The ACTF awarded Jack Young the Alan Kreuzer Award in 2019 and the PNG presented him with the Sol Kaplan Award in 2022. He started collecting as a youth, filling a Lincoln penny board with his grandmother, and continues to collect low-grade early large cents by date and some varieties.

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