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CAC Coins Bring Premiums During March 2018

Coins that have been reviewed and stickered by Certified Acceptance Corporation (CAC) consistently bring premiums over other “non-stickered” coins in the marketplace. Below are some examples from recent actions sales on March 2018 one may use for a refference.

Here are 10 examples among many that could be listed:

  1. On March 4, GreatCollections sold a CAC-approved, EF-40 1903-S Morgan silver dollar for $357.75 USD. On March 6, Heritage sold a certified EF-40 1903-S, without a CAC sticker, for $253.20. In January, Heritage sold a certified EF-40 1903-S silver dollar without CAC approval for $312. In October 2017, another major auction firm sold one for $288.

 

  1. On March 4, an NGC-graded AU-58 1911-S $10 gold coin, with a CAC sticker, realized $3,046.50. On February 23, Heritage auctioned a certified AU-58 1911-S, without a CAC sticker, for $2640.

 

  1. On March 11, GreatCollections sold a CAC-approved “MS-67” 1914-D dime for $8,493.75. Representative auction results for non-CAC “MS-67” dimes are: $3,290 in March 2016 in Baltimore; $4,700 in March 2015; $5,462.50 in January 2012; $3,335 in September 2010 at the Long Beach Expo; $2,300 in February 2010; and $2,760 in July 2009. The same CAC 1914-D that GreatCollections just sold was auctioned in December 2014 for $8,518.75. A different CAC MS-67 1914-D was auctioned for $6,900 in April 2011. Clearly, CAC MS-67 1914-D dimes have been bringing much more than non-CAC MS-67 1914-D dimes.

 

  1. On March 11, GreatCollections sold a CAC-approved “MS-65” 1928 Hawaiian commemorative half dollar for $3,543.75. Heritage recently auctioned two certified “MS-65” 1928 Hawaiian halves, each without a CAC sticker, for $2,880 on February 23 and for $2,640 on March 31.

 

  1. On March 18, GreatCollections sold a CAC-approved, ‘MS-67 Red’ 1947 Lincoln cent for $6,469.88. Four days later, Stack’s-Bowers auctioned a certified ‘MS-67 Red’ 1947 in a major collection, but without a CAC sticker, for $1,440. In November 2017, Heritage sold a certified ‘MS-67 Red’ 1947 Lincoln for $1,080.

 

  1. On March 22, Stack’s-Bowers auctioned a CAC-approved ‘MS-67 Red’ 1927 Lincoln cent for $5,280. About a month earlier, Heritage auctioned a 1927 Lincoln cent with the same certification but without a CAC sticker for $1,440. In November 2017, Heritage auctioned another with this same certification, also without a CAC sticker, for $1,020.

 

  1. On March 22, Stack’s-Bowers auctioned a CAC-approved ‘MS-66 Red’ 1930-S Lincoln cent for $1,320. So far this year, Heritage has sold two certified ‘MS-66 Red’ 1930-S Lincoln cents, without CAC stickers, for $360 in February and for $528 in January. In October 2017, GreatCollections sold a ‘MS-66 Red’ 1930-S, without a CAC sticker, for $596.25.

 

  1. On March 22, Stack’s-Bowers auctioned a CAC-approved MS-64 1925-D $20 gold coin for $31,200. Heritage auctioned a non-CAC MS-64 1925-D for $12,512.50 in April 2017 and another for $14,100 in January 2017.

 

  1. On March 22, Stack’s-Bowers auctioned a CAC-approved MS-64 1850-O half dollar for $7,800. Since coin markets peaked in the middle of 2008, there have been more than a half-dozen auction appearances of non-CAC 1850-O halves that are certified as MS-64 or “MS-64+” and not one of them sold for as much as $3550.

 

  1. On March 22, Stack’s-Bowers auctioned a CAC-approved MS-64 1889 half dollar for $2,640. A month earlier, Heritage auctioned a certified MS-64 1889 half, without a CAC sticker, for $1500.

 

CAC
CAChttps://www.cacgrading.com/
CAC was founded by leading members of the numismatic community, including John Albanese, a respected authority on coin grading and the rare coin market. The CAC GREEN Label signifies that a coin has met Certified Acceptance Corporation's stringent grading standards. Coins are accepted through CAC Submission Centers. These are knowledgeable dealers who will assist you with your submission and the associated guidelines.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. I’m not a fan of CAC. The top slab companies do their jobs just fine. Coins of with the same grade do look different, but that’s why a buyer should always still look at the coin. I guess CAC would be good for sight-unseen coins, and maybe really expensive ones (like over 1k). Otherwise, it’s an erroneous service in my opinion.

  2. I think CAC serves a valid purpose but they have a strong tendency to sticker coins with ugly, brown spot mottled toning. I would never buy one of these just because it has a CAC sticker.

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